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Barrington divorce attorney When going through a high-net-worth divorce, it is common for one spouse to have far greater financial means than the other. Even in a divorce between spouses of more modest means, one spouse may have been the primary bread-winner of the household. Spousal maintenance exists in order to help a divorcee who may be unable to support themselves or maintain their accustomed lifestyle on their own.

How long will the payments last? Illinois has guidelines and formulas that instruct courts on how to determine whether maintenance should be permanent or temporary and how long the payments should continue if they are temporary.

Temporary Maintenance

Spousal maintenance can be indefinite or temporary, depending on your financial situation and the duration of your marriage. Temporary maintenance may be for a fixed number of years or reviewable. With fixed-term maintenance, Illinois uses a scale that calculates the duration of the payments based on how many years the marriage lasted. For instance, if your marriage lasted for less than five years, the duration of the maintenance payments will be 20 percent of the number of years that you were married. After five years of marriage, the percentage will increase for each one-year interval until it reaches 20 years of marriage. You can also agree to receive maintenance in a lump sum after the divorce is completed.

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Barrington wrongful death lawyersIt is an unfortunate reality that not everyone will survive major accidents that would have otherwise left them severely injured. More than 1,000 people die in vehicle crashes in Illinois each year, according to recent data from the Illinois Department of Transportation. While fatal vehicle accidents make up less than 1 percent of the total crashes in Illinois, each death has an irreversible impact on the family of the person who was killed. If another party is liable for the fatal accident, the surviving family members can file a wrongful death lawsuit in order to receive monetary compensation.

When Can a Wrongful Death Lawsuit Be Filed?

A simple way to explain a wrongful death claim is that it is a personal injury lawsuit filed on behalf of the deceased person. Illinois law states that survivors of the deceased can file a wrongful death claim if:

  • Someone’s wrongful act or negligence caused the death
  • The victim would have had grounds to file a personal injury claim if they had survived

With a fatal vehicle accident, a reckless driver may have been responsible for the crash or a vehicle manufacturer may be liable for a defective part that caused a driver to lose control of their vehicle. Wrongful death claims can also apply to other areas of personal injury, such as premises liability and third-party construction accidents.

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Barrington, IL family law attorney legal guardianship

In some instances, both biological parents raising their child is not a possibility. Maybe the child has lost his or her parents or perhaps the parents have a history of abuse and therefore lost custody of their child. When a parent dies or is deemed unable to care for a child, the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) will typically look to the child’s next of kin to be his or her caregiver. Aunts, uncles, and grandparents are valid options to care for the child as a legal guardian. However, grandparents may struggle to financially support the child, especially if they are retired and do not have a biweekly income. Luckily, the state of Illinois offers a number of financial assistance options to help these guardians support their grandchild.

Assistance Options

The Illinois government provides legal guardians with financial assistance in a number of ways. Depending on your financial situation, you may be eligible to receive the following assistance:

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Three Safety Tips for New Illinois Motorcycle RidersBeing behind the wheel for the first time can be an exhilarating yet nerve-wracking experience for young, new drivers. They never have the same instinct and ease as those with years of experience under their belt. The same goes for those who have recently obtained their motorcycle license. While you may have spent years driving a passenger vehicle, getting behind the handlebars of a motorcycle is a whole new ballgame. These small, unprotected vehicles can leave even the most experienced riders with serious or fatal injuries. If you have recently obtained your Illinois motorcycle license, heed the following precautions before taking your first ride:

  1. Get the Right Bike for You: There are a vast number of models that one can choose from when looking for their first motorcycle. While you may be leaning towards the larger, more advanced motorcycles, it is critical that you test out the bike before purchasing. When sitting, your feet should be able to easily rest flat on the ground and the handlebars should be right within reach. The larger bikes may be more alluring, but a motorcycle that is not the right fit for your body can lead you into dangerous waters. 
  2. Antilock Brakes Are Worth the Investment: Antilock brakes have proven to save lives time and time again. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, motorcycles with antilock brakes were 37 percent less likely to be in a fatal crash than those without them. These special brakes allow motorcycle riders to maintain steering control during an emergency stop, rather than having the brakes lock up. This will reduce a rider’s chances of skidding and crashing and is also useful in bad weather conditions.
  3. Take a Safety Course: In order to legally ride a motorcycle on Illinois roadways, a motorcycle license is required. However, this does not mean that a course is technically mandatory — it simply requires the passing of a written exam and driving test. Safety experts always suggest that new riders take a training course to learn basic riding skills and more advanced safety measures. The courses can sometimes provide other benefits, such as discounted insurance rates and a credit towards a new motorcycle depending on the manufacturer.

Call a Barrington Personal Injury Lawyer

No matter how many precautions or safety measures you have taken, you can never control the abilities of other drivers on the road. Accidents involving motorcycle riders are often caused by passenger vehicles, but due to their lack of protection, motorcycle riders suffer more serious consequences. The legal team at Joseph M. Lucas & Associates, LLC, assists both motorcycle drivers and passengers to help them obtain the compensation they deserve for their injuries. We have extensive experience handling motorcycle accident cases and understand the unique issues involved. If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident, contact our Illinois personal injury attorneys at 847-381-8700 to schedule your free consultation.

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How Child Support Can Help Pay for CollegeA parent’s financial responsibility to their child does not always end when the child turns 18. Many children need help to pay for their continuing education after high school, whether that is attending a community college or a four-year university. Because of this, child support payments can continue after a child turns 18 so that both parents are helping pay for college. However, the child support payments will end if you do not take action. You must file a court motion to extend child support for college expenses and explain how much support your child will need from the paying parent.

What Does College Child Support Cover?

Illinois normally uses an income shares table to calculate how much both parents should pay towards child expenses. When continuing child support for college, you need to present the expenses that you expect to pay for your child’s education, such as:

  • Tuition and fees to attend the college
  • Room and board, which can include off-campus housing
  • College application fees
  • Textbooks and other required materials
  • Healthcare coverage
  • Living expenses for when the child is living on their own, even if college is not in session

As a condition for ordering continued child support, the court may require the student to make a good-faith effort to limit expenses. For instance, the child may need to choose the less expensive college when deciding between multiple colleges that will provide equitable opportunities.

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